'The Winds of Winter' Release Date, News & Update: George R.R. Martin's 'ASOIAF' Book Cancelled?

By Miah Spencer , Updated Oct 15, 2016 12:04 PM EDT
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George R.R. Martin's "The Winds of Winter" is suffering a lot because of the author's busy schedule. "Game of Thrones" season 6 had already been aired but the sixth novel of the "A Song of Ice and Fire" book series is still in the works. Actually, the status of the highly anticipated novel is still uncertain leading many to the conclusion that it has already been cancelled.

"The Winds of Winter" is supposed to be released in 2017 but the launching is now becoming uncertain. George R.R. Martin's team earlier provided an exact date when the book will be released but right now they are no longer sure when the author would be able to finish it considering his schedule.

Though many are already speculating about its cancellation, the famous author has not yet made any official announcement so it is safe to assume that he will continue working on it. He is not quitting as the writer of "The Winds of Winter," contrary to recent reports.

George R.R. Martin already explained why "The Winds of Winter" keeps on being delayed. Earlier this year, he made a public announcement on his website that his schedule and age are affecting his writing speed. He also assured his readers that even if the sixth season of "Game of Thrones" is already done, they will still enjoy reading "The Winds of Winter" as there will be unique contents.

GameNGuide earlier reported that the author is still months away from finishing "The Winds of Winter." This means that it will not be cancelled but might be delayed to 2018.

Fans will have to wait for more updates about "The Winds of Winter" from George R.R. Martin himself. Many are hoping for the novel to be released before the airing of "Game of Thrones" season 7.

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