‘Fallout’ On Xbox One; Reasons Why Their Other RPG Was Canceled

By Danny Smith , Updated Feb 05, 2017 09:50 PM EST
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"Fallout: New Vegas" had been through on Xbox One while the Obsidian Entertainment's other role-playing game will not make its way on the console. The Obsidian RPG that didn't make it on Xbox One for some reasons is the game called "Stormlands". After Microsoft scrapped the project, Fergus Urquhart came forward to reveal the reason why.

According to IGN, Fergus Urquhart said that having plenty of budgets and having a champion will make the game through. The champion that Urquhart mentioned refers to someone at the publisher who can defend the game at Microsoft. The big-budgeted game is going to be good to go if there is someone at the publisher who has the ability and the attitude to defend and assure the higher-ups of the game, Urquhart added. On the contrary, Obsidian became less fortunate of having any of those two mentioned.

As a result of the game cancellation, 30 developers were reportedly laid off by Obsidian, as mentioned by GameSpot. "Stormlands" has no other details but it was told that it aims to be a "premier RPG". The said game "Stormlands" was canceled by Microsoft before it was to get a green light during the final meeting on March 2012. The cancellation happened before the system launches the "Fallout: New Vegas" and "Knights of the Old Republic 2".

"It all comes down to budget and having a champion because games that had champions weren't canceled but $80 million were spent, Urquhart said. Games that had a champion and only $10 million budget ended up with nothing, but games which budget is $60 million and had a champion is shipped. On the other hand, Obsidian's Pillars of Eternity II: Deadfire has been a big hit in its first week for raising a more than $2 million already on their crowdfunding campaign through Kickstarter.

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